Bilingual Books

Miwal ga Djambuwal

Spirit Woman and Spirit Boy

Miwal ga Djambuwal is a story from the Marrangu Djinang people of Central Arnhem Land which tells the travels of a Spirit Woman (Miwal) and a Spirit Boy (Djambuwal) through Marrangu Djinang country, naming places, looking for sugarbag, hunting frill-necked lizard, and meeting other Spirit figures such as the Djangkawu Sisters who play a central role in Yolngu mythology. Featuring original illustrations by the book's author, Stanley Rankin, this version is presented in Djinang and English languages and includes a word list.

A Kriol elfabet frieze based on the Kriol Sound Chart poster (http://batchelorpress.com/node/387) recently updated and developed with the Meigim Kriol Strongbala program in the Ngukkur community, NT. The frieze is laminated both sides for extra durability and measures almost five metres in length and approx. 20 centimetres high. It comes packaged in a custom, stickered tube. A handsome addition to the Kriol learning classroom or for those with an interest in Top End Aboriginal languages. The frieze is also complemented by a set of Kriol elfabet flaschards (sold separately): http://batchelorpress.com/node/400 Image shown is a detail.      

Karri-ni kun-red kadberre man-djewk na-kudji.

A year in my country.

The original book Nga-ni Kun-red Ngarduk Man-djewk Na-dudji was published in Kune in 2018. This beautifully illustrated book on seasons was so popular that the Kuninjku people decided to translate from Kune into Kuninjku. Both Kuninjku and Kune are langauges of central Arnhem Land, Australia. The original text is by Jull Yirrindilli and translated into Kuninjku by Charlie Nanguwerr and Margot Gurrawiliwili, with transciption and English translation by Carolyn Coleman. 

Belaa Plants and Animals

Biocultural knowledge of the Kwini people of the far north Kimberley, Australia

This book mainly documents the Belaa language, however, any of the words used may be the same or similar to those used by people from the Forrest River area and other parts of Balanggarra country. 

This book is a powerful testament to the depth and complexity of the biocultural knowledge of the Kwini elders who wrote this book. It is also an indication of the successful passing-on of detailed plant and animal knowledge for thousands of generations. This book forms a new unbreakable link in a chain of knowledge tranmission reaching back to the Dreamtime.

Nga-ni Kun-red Ngarduk Man-djewk Na-kudji 'A Year in my Country'

A year in my country

This book tells a story about the life of Kune people who live near the community of Maningrida in north-central Arnhem Land, Australia. This is rich hunting country, abundant in plant and animal life, that shifts and changes through the yearly seasonal cycle.

Language: 

Marri Amu and Marri Tjevin Plants and Animals

Aboriginal biocultural knowledge from the Moyle river, plains and coast, north Australia

This book is a species rich and a culturally detailed account of the biocultural knowledge of the Marri Amu and Marri Tjevin people. It is a powerful testament to the knowledge of the senior authors, and a wonderful legacy for all future generations.

Language: 

Ayeye Thipe-akerte - Arrernte stories about birds - 2nd EDITION

Eastern Arrernte artist and writer Therese Ryder uses pictures and words to describe the birds that live on her country. She appreciates their beauty and their songs, and the roles that they play as messengers and as food. Therese writes and speaks her stories in the Arrernte language, alongside written English translations.

Songs of Home

Anmatyerr and Kam singing traditions

Songs of Home celebrates the significance and richness of Indigenous song, and reminds us of the fundamental connections between singing and home. The project has brought together expert singers from Australia and China – Anmatyerr women singers from Ti-Tree in Central Australia, and Kam women singers from Liping county in Guizhou province, China. The two groups performed jointly during a week long visit to the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, at the University of Sydney in April 2017.

Mayarni-kari Yurrk

More Stories from Gurindji Country
The Gurindji people hold a secure place in Australian history. Their 1966 strike for better pay and conditions on the pastoral station that had forced them into indentured labour attracted national interest and became famous as the Wave Hill Walk Off. The strike developed into a claim for ownership of their traditional lands.
 

Language: 

Pages