Books

Displaying 121 - 129 of 129
  • Jirigi Jinda Ardangarri, Burnarri Anja, Diigu Aagala - Birds

    Jirigi Jinda Ardangarri, Burnarri Anja, Diigu Aagala – Birds: tells us the names of birds in Ngarinyin, Worrorra and Wunambal Gaambara languages. The bird’s moiety, and the spiritual and seasonal knowledge associated with some birds gives an insight into the cultural importance of some birds for Ngarinyin, Worrorra and Wunambal Gaambara people.

  • Marri Amu and Marri Tjevin Plants and Animals

    Aboriginal biocultural knowledge from the Moyle river, plains and coast, north Australia

    This book is a species rich and a culturally detailed account of the biocultural knowledge of the Marri Amu and Marri Tjevin people. It is a powerful testament to the knowledge of the senior authors, and a wonderful legacy for all future generations.

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  • NGUÑ KOONGURRUKUÑ

    Speak Koongurrukuñ

    'Language is the very essence of Aboriginal identity.' These are Ida Bishop's words and they embody the reason why this work is of such great importance. 

    This work is important because it provides a written, permanent record of a rich indigenous language which would otherwise in time disappear with the passing on of its oral custodians.

  • Ngany Me

    My Body Book

    This book shows names for parts of the body in Noongar. This book is based on a previous publication designed by the staff at the Titjikala Childcare Centre in 2005

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  • An-nguliny Rarrk

    Maningrida Arts and Culture and Batchelor Institute Press are extremely proud to present a new book, called An‑nguliny Rarrk, celebrating the work of Gun‑nartpa artist Mick Marrawa England from Gochan Jiny-jirra in Arnhem Land.

    Language: 

  • We Always Stay

    We Always Stay contains the stories of seven remarkable teachers from remote communities in central Australia. All of these teachers speak, read and write in at least their own language as well as English. Many of them are multilingual in several Aboriginal languages.

  • Belaa Plants and Animals

    Biocultural knowledge of the Kwini people of the far north Kimberley, Australia

    This book mainly documents the Belaa language, however, any of the words used may be the same or similar to those used by people from the Forrest River area and other parts of Balanggarra country. 

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